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The National Transportation Safety Board has recommended that the limit for blood alcohol levels for drivers be lowered to 0.05.  The NTSB has also recommended that measures be taken to encourage broader use of interlock devices. Mothers Against Drunk Driving and the American Automobile Association have not yet endorsed the NTSB’s recommendations.

In its report, the NTSB renewed its recommendation that all DUI/DWI offenders be required to install an interlock device on their vehicles.  The NTSB also reiterated its support of pre-conviction license confiscation and recommended that those charged, yet not convicted of DUI, be required to have an interlock device installed before having their licenses returned (administrative license suspension/administrative license revocation).

*Note: Pennsylvania most recently lowered the legal limit for blood alcohol to 0.08 in 2003.  In Pennsylvania, you can be convicted of driving under the influence with any amount of alcohol in your system if your level of impairment renders you incapable of safe driving.

For more information, go to:

“Reaching Zero: Actions to Eliminate Alcohol-Impaired Driving”-National Transportation Safety Board

“Safety Board Recommends Defining Legally Drunk With Lower Blood Alcohol Level”-Time Magazine 05/15/2013

“Could Lower DUI Standards Be Decades Away in PA, NJ?”-Philly.com

Changing drunken driving threshold from .08 blood alcohol level to .05 recommended-RGJ.com

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On July 7th, 2011, Governor Tom Corbett signed a law into effect that would immunize underage drinkers from criminal charges if they are seeking medical attention for another person.  The purpose of this law is to encourage underage drinkers to call for help if they see another person who is “in need of immediate medical attention to prevent death or serious injury.”

To qualify for amnesty under the new law, a person must show that the only reason why law enforcement became aware of the underage drinking (or possession of alcohol) was because 1.) the underaged person called for help in a situation where they reasonably believed that another person was in need of serious medical attention, 2.) the underaged person reasonably believed that he was the first to call for help, 3.) the underaged person gave his name to the emergency responder when he called for help, 4.) the underaged person stayed with the person suffering a medical emergency until help arrived and his presence is no longer necessary.

For more information, go to:

In the News: Pa considers underage drinking amnesty law

http://www.legis.state.pa.us/CFDOCS/Legis/PN/Public/btCheck.cfm?txtType=PDF&sessYr=2011&sessInd=0&billBody=S&billTyp=B&billNbr=0448&pn=1458

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Pennsylvania State Senator Stewart Greenleaf has introduced a bill requiring beer kegs to registered. Sen. Greenleaf has unsuccessfully proposed this bill for 16 years.

Under the proposed law, those who buy kegs of beer would be required to fill out a form disclosing their name and address. The keg would be tagged with an identifying number keyed to the buyer’s information. Sen. Greenleaf contends that keg registration will help deter underage drinking in Pennsylvania.

For more information, go to:

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/the_intelligencer/the_intelligencer_news_details/article/27/2009/march/30/beer-keg-bill-rolling-along.html

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